Museums and Social Media

Museums are made for social media. Here are institutions that curate things that people are passionate about.

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My local museum is the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV). On their social media accounts (Facebook, Twitter and Instagram) they do an excellent job of promoting what is going on at their two galleries (NGV International and The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia) and being sociable. However, they don’t ask followers any questions about their relationship to the art or the gallery.

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In contrast, the MoMA in New York is interested in its followers thoughts:

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Here’s a few ideas that could improve the NGV’s social presence.

  1. Unlike a lot of museums, the NGV permits visitors to take photos of the art. To integrate photos taken in the museum with the actual artworks, they could add an individual hashtag to each piece’s identification card.
    For example, this painting by Gerhard Richter could be labelled #ngvrichterabstract. The paintings page on the NGV’s website could then use an application like Pixlee to collate the images from Twitter, Instagram and Facebook (Pixlee features pre-moderation).
    Of course, the hashtag would also collate comments across the web, encouraging visitors to see the debate about the painting while they are in the gallery. (An app for the NGV would make this easier for visitors.)
    Budding artists (eg school groups), who choose to respond to the painting with their own artwork, could also be encouraged to tag their representations for upload to the painting’s web page.
  2. The tourism board of Sweden do an interesting thing with Twitter. They created an account that is run by a different Swede each week. Likewise, the NGV could create another Twitter account and hand it over to staff, local artists, and regular visitors.
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  3. Pinterest is the perfect social media platform for museums. It is visual and it is all about curation. Playing into that synergy, it would be interesting to see which artworks Pinterest users would curate from the museum to create their own exhibition space. A competition could even result in a temporary exhibition in the museum of a visitor’s selection.
    Nordstrom has tested using feedback from Pinterest users’ pins to highlight the products in its stores.
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Three ideas for social media for museums. Do you have any other ideas? Or have you seen a museum doing some interesting social media integration?

fastcompany:

Every tool for social media that you will ever need (for now).
Banana Republic and Susan’s Neighborhood Shirt Shop could be using the same social networks—Twitter, Facebook, Google+, etc.—but their marketing plans and their marketing tools are likely quite different. Enterprise solutions are great for the big guys, but the rest of us are in the market for something more our size.
Small businesses are eager to find valuable tools that take a lot of the time and trouble out of social media marketing and that do so without costing an arm and a leg. I think we’d all want tools like that, right?
Well, I went searching for just this kind of simple, easy, cost-effective tool, and I came up with 60 that made the cut. I tried out more than 100 in total, and I’m sure I missed a few along the way.
Hopefully you find one or two here that you can use in your small scale marketing that can get you big results.
Read More>
[Image: Flickr user Jim Pennucci]

fastcompany:

Every tool for social media that you will ever need (for now).

Banana Republic and Susan’s Neighborhood Shirt Shop could be using the same social networks—Twitter, Facebook, Google+, etc.—but their marketing plans and their marketing tools are likely quite different. Enterprise solutions are great for the big guys, but the rest of us are in the market for something more our size.

Small businesses are eager to find valuable tools that take a lot of the time and trouble out of social media marketing and that do so without costing an arm and a leg. I think we’d all want tools like that, right?

Well, I went searching for just this kind of simple, easy, cost-effective tool, and I came up with 60 that made the cut. I tried out more than 100 in total, and I’m sure I missed a few along the way.

Hopefully you find one or two here that you can use in your small scale marketing that can get you big results.

Read More>

[Image: Flickr user Jim Pennucci]

Reblogged from fastcompany

How will we define Web 4.0?

Tim O’Reilly popularised the term Web 2.0 to define the social web. We have since moved onto Web 3.0. I want to go back through the three versions of the web so that we can glimpse what Web 4.0 might look like. This is a history of WWW in very broad strokes.

Web 1.0

While the origins of the internet were very social, the first world wide web was essentially old media. Brands/websites broadcast their messages and users couldn’t publicly communicate with each other (email allowed private communication).

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Web 2.0

In Web 2.0, users could reply to brands/websites and communicate with each other. The original blogging platforms and social networks facilitated mass communication between the average user. Thus, the conversation was born between brands and customers.

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Web 3.0

In Web 3.0 websites use ‘big data’ to give a personal interaction with with brands. Based on data about what users have liked/disliked, websites are able to tailor content and products for their users. Amazon, for example, is able to provide recommendations for its customers based their what they have liked/disliked and what other items their twinsumer has liked/disliked. Wearable technology and the general internet of things is a continuation of this big data trend.

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Web 4.0

If we look at the overall evolution of the web we can see a to and fro of brands versus consumers. First, brands were dominant, then users were enabled to communicate, then brands responded with accumulating data. If this to and fro continues then it’s the user’s turn to define Web 4.0. 

Evidence of this response is seen in such trends as crowdfunding, where presumers are financing products that are aligned with their personal requirements. The rise of prosumers is also challenging corporate brands. Start-ups are faster at adapting to customer needs than corporations, but prosumers are even more agile.

Essentially everyone has the ability to be a producer these days, whether it is selling candles on Etsy or licensing themes for WordPress blogs on Envato. The next step may involve these people joining together into flexible commercial communities that produce more complex products and services.

shaman-tito:

How #Mobile Are #Social #Networks? @statista @StatistaCharts
As mobile #devices play an increasingly large role in our everyday media consumption, social #networking was among the first activities to become mobile-first:  However, some social networks are more mobile than others as our chart shows. While #Instagram, #Pinterest and #Twitter are used almost exclusively on mobile devices,  #Facebook usage is more evenly distributed across devices. The future of social networking is clearly mobile though, with #Tumblr and #LinkedIn the only notable exceptions to the rule.
#pinoftheday #Infographics #SocialMedia #internet #social #media #network http://www.statista.com/chart/2091/mobile-usage-of-social-networks/

shaman-tito:

How #Mobile Are #Social #Networks? @statista @StatistaCharts

As mobile #devices play an increasingly large role in our everyday media consumption, social #networking was among the first activities to become mobile-first:
However, some social networks are more mobile than others as our chart shows. While #Instagram, #Pinterest and #Twitter are used almost exclusively on mobile devices,
#Facebook usage is more evenly distributed across devices. The future of social networking is clearly mobile though, with #Tumblr and #LinkedIn the only notable exceptions to the rule.

#pinoftheday #Infographics #SocialMedia #internet #social #media #network
http://www.statista.com/chart/2091/mobile-usage-of-social-networks/

Reblogged from shaman-tito

How to Increase Follower Engagement on Social Media Platforms

Content marketing is the cornerstone of any good social media strategy. The content might be user-generated or professional, or ideally a combination of the two. 

These are the four pillars of content marketing that lead to engagement:

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1. Relevant: On-brand, no kittens. I know kittens are everywhere on the web, but you aren’t going to win if you compete with everywhere.

Example: NASA

2. Topical: Is new or timely. News media is the most topical industry, but every brand can be topical. For example, the calendar year is full of events, from Mother’s Day to the Super Bowl, so there is bound to be many that are relevant to the brand/products.

Example: Ebay

3. Informative: Helpful to the customer. So you’re relevant, but it doesn’t end there. You’ve also got to be informative about your area of expertise. People don’t share stuff everyone knows. “71% of consumers trust brands that provide useful info without trying to sell them something” (Source).

Example: Lifehacker

4. Inspirational: Lead and excite. Being inspiring is about showing how the brand is human: there is a passion for what it does for its customers, not just for profit.

Examples: Whole Foods

What are your favourite social media accounts for content?